Nathaniel Arbiter

"For his contributions to the Mineral Industries and to the advancement of our profession, as an Educator, as a Research Scientist, and as an Engineer. His ability to analyze and solve difficult problems and his willingness to assist others have brought to AIME and the Mineral Industry of the world, advancements in flotation and other beneficiation processes."

AIME Robert H. Richards Award in 1961

Nathaniel Arbiter was born in Yonkers, N. Y., in 1911, and received his degrees from Columbia University where he is currently Professor of Mineral Engineering in the Henry Krumb School of Mines.

From 1938 to 1943, Mr. Arbiter was Research Assistant with the Arthur F. Taggart Co. There he investigated thermo dynamics and kinetics of petroleum cracking; mechanism and kinetics of solution of gold in cyanide solutions; contact angles and surface chemistry of flotation. In 1943, he spent a year at Battelle Memorial Institute, investigating principally iron ore flotation.

Mr. Arbiter joined the staff of Phelps Dodge Corporation in August 1944, and remained with this company until July 1951, when he was appointed to the staff of Columbia University. During his term with Phelps Dodge, he worked on methods for increasing concentrate grade and recovery at Morenci Reduction Works Concentrator; helped to develop methods for molybdenite recovery from Morenci concentrate; studied methods for recovery of oxide copper from tailings; use of ammonia for leaching oxide copper, and use of ion exchange for concentrating copper leach solutions. His research has also covered problems in comminution, flotation, properties of fine particles, and agglomeration.

In addition to his other activities, Mr. Arbiter has been Consultant to mining and chemical companies in the United States, Canada, Central and South America, and the Middle East. A Member of AIME since 1943, he was Chairman of the Minerals Beneficiation Division in 1958 and, in 1960, Director and Treasurer of the Society of Mining Engineers of AIME.